sisterhood

Feminism at the Superbowl

Mon, 02/06/2017 - 07:55
Submitted by Carlin Ross

I don't think we've ever had a more policitized Superbowl.  Most of the ads had a clear pro-diversity theme and it made me proud to be an American.

Then there was this moment when the Schuyler Sisters from the cast of Hamilton sang America the Beautiful and inserted "sisterhood" after the line "and crown thy hood in brotherhood"...it was electric:

Maybe we needed some push back to pave the way for true equality.   The people have spoken.

Getting Naked Helped Us Heal

Fri, 06/03/2016 - 08:06
Submitted by Julia Emerald

As I sat down to write about Bodysex last week, I noticed the last lily bud from centerpiece flowers beginning to open.

I feel like that lily bud. Both attending and facilitating Bodysex has opened me so much and this workshop was no exception. It infused me with the strength to unfurl my wings in new and deeper ways.

All of our inner-buds unfurled to reveal beauty long held inside but kept private. When the world doesn't understand sexual pleasure as healthy and normal, even the most empowered woman feels at times she must hide herself to spare the judgment of a shaming world.

Bodysex Taught Me We All Fear Not Being Enough

Fri, 04/01/2016 - 07:07
Submitted by Julia Emerald

Most of my life I have felt more comfortable with men than women. I made friends with the 'dudes' and always had a few around to hang with, talk to and make me feel beautiful and valued.

When it came to connecting with women, I walked the tight rope of both desiring to belong and fearing I wouldn't be accepted. I felt sure they would see my flaws and expose me as anything but 'normal.'

I remember my first Bodysex workshop and how excited I was to join the group of women, to see all the unique bodies naked and the beautiful variety of vulvas. Despite my excitement though, the morning of Bodysex all my insecurities rose to the surface.

I Have Become Invisible –- to Men but Beautiful to Women

Mon, 07/18/2011 - 15:01
Submitted by Anonymous

When I was an adolescent living in Brooklyn, New York, I did what a lot of teenage girls did. I tried on makeup, flirted with boys, fought with my parents, hated my sister, etc. I was fiercely conscious of how I looked. I think I saw the power of pretty at a very young age.

One thing that’s interesting to me now when I look back, is how much the definition of pretty has changed. It used to be Barbie, long blonde hair, busty, flashy, small mouthed, you know.
For me, it was definitely not what I looked like. First of all I had a mass of curly, sometimes, frizzy, dark hair and not a clue what to do with it.